516-972-1212

1225 Franklin Ave.,
Ste. 325
Garden City, NY 11530

  •   ›  
  • White Collar Crime

White Collar Crime

The term "white collar crime" is a broad term used to describe a variety of economic crimes. Almost every example of a white collar offense includes some illegal act to gain money, goods, services or something else of value. When people think of these crimes they often imagine high profile businessmen or businesswomen committing these offenses. However, white collar crimes are severely common.

Economic crimes can carry serious consequences, including years of imprisonment, expensive fines and possibly both. In some instances when a person is convicted of a white collar offense, he or she could face losing their career. These allegations always should be taken seriously and charges should be handled immediately.

Nassau County White Collar Crime Defense Attorney

A conviction for an economic crime could change the rest of your life. A person could face jail time, expensive fines and possibly even lose his or her job. If you have been charged with a white collar offense, contact Garden City white collar offense lawyer Stephanie Selloni. Selloni has years of experience fighting for clients like you, and she can help you get a favorable outcome in your case.

Stephanie Selloni represents clients in Garden City, Syosset, Hempstead and other locations in the greater Long Island area. She also represents clients throughout the five boroughs of New York City. She can review your case when you contact Law Office of Stephanie Selloni today at 516-972-1212 to set up a free consultation.


Information About White Collar Crimes


Back to top

What are Economic Crimes?

White collar crimes, or economic crimes, are those that are committed for some sort of gain. Most often, this is a monetary or financial benefit. Generally, white collar crimes involve illegally obtaining money or assets through illegal activity, such as fraud, forgery or other ways of deception.

These offenses could include small theft crimes or major fraud offenses, and they can occur anywhere and affect people of all financial income. Common examples of white collar crimes include those committed through the means of commerce, such as conspiracy and various types of fraud.

Some of the most common white collar crimes include:

Credit Card Fraud— According to New York Penal Code §155.30, a person can be charged with credit card fraud for various reasons, including if he or she fraudulently accessed credit card information, opened a new credit or debit card account using another individual's personal information or misrepresented yourself as the individual named on a debit or credit card. The offense could range from a Class A misdemeanor to Class B felony.

Issuing a Bad Check — A person can be convicted of this offense if he or she knowingly writes a check when there are insufficient funds in the bank account associated with the check to cover the amount of the check, according to New York Penal Code §190.05. This is a Class B misdemeanor.

Forgery — Forgery in the third degree occurs if a person falsely makes, completes or changes a written instrument in order to defraud, deceive or injure another. This is a Class A misdemeanor. Forgery in the second degree occurs if the instrument is a credit card, deed, contract, will, prescription or public record. This would be a Class D felony. Forgery in the first degree could occur if the instrument is money, stamps, stocks, bonds, securities or any government-issued valuable instrument. This could be a Class C felony.

Embezzlement — Embezzlement is a type of property theft that occurs when someone who was entrusted to manage another person's money or property steals all or part of that money or property for his or her own personal gain. In New York, the offense is punished according to the value or type of property stolen. This could range from a Class A misdemeanor to a Class B felony.

Scheme to Defraud —This occurs in the second degree when a person engages in a scheme or plan with the intent of obtaining property through fraudulent means. This would be a Class A misdemeanor. Scheme to defraud in the first degree occurs when a person engages in a plan or scheme to defraud 10 people or to obtain more than $1,000. This would be a Class E felony.

Falsifying Business Records —Falsifying business records in the second degree occurs if a person makes a false entry in business records; alters, deletes or removes a true record in business records; fails to make a true entry in a business record; or prevents the making of a true entry in a business record, all with the intent to defraud. This would be a Class A misdemeanor. Falsifying business records in the first degree occurs when a person commits falsifying business records in the second degree, but also intends to commit, aid in the commission of, or conceal another crime. This would be a Class E felony.


Back to top

Identity Theft Under New York Law

Identity theft, also known as identity fraud, can be committed in three different degrees. Identity theft in the third degree, which is a Class A misdemeanor, occurs when a person knowingly assumes the identity of another with the intent to commit fraud. In these cases, a person must present themselves as the other person or use personal identifying information of that person and do one of the following:

  • Acquire money
  • Use services
  • Purchase goods
  • Obtain property
  • Cause some sort of financial loss
  • Use the other person's credit
  • Commit at least a Class A misdemeanor while in the commission of the fraud

Identity theft in the second degree is a slightly different offense, largely based on the amount of money involved. The act can occur in the same way, but the offender would have to acquire money, services, goods or property in an amount greater than $500. This would be a Class E felony.

Identity fraud in the first degree occurs when a person knowingly assumes the identity of another with the intent to commit fraud and acquires money, goods, services, property or credit in an amount greater than $2,000. This could be considered a Class D felony, which could carry serious penalties.


Back to top

Penalties for White Collar Offenses

When a person is charged with a white collar offense, he or she could face various penalties, including jail time and expensive fines. However, the punishment for the crime varies largely based on the amount of money involved in the offense. Some of the possible penalties for white collar offenses include:

Class B misdemeanor — Up to three months in jail, $500 in fines or both
Class A misdemeanor — Up to one year in jail, two to three years of probation, a fine up to $1,000 or all three punishments
Class E felony — Up to four years in prison, up to $5,000 in fines or double the defendant’s gain from committing the offense, and between three and five years on probation
Class D felony —Up to seven years in prison, between three and five years of probation and up to $5,000 in fines or double the defendant’s gain from committing the offense
Class C felony — Up to 15 years in prison, between three and five years of probation and up to $5,000 in fines or double the defendant’s gain from committing the offense
Class B felony — Up to 25 years in prison with a minimum of either one year or one-third of the maximum sentence given


Back to top

Finding the Best White Collar Crime Lawyer in Garden City

If you have been charged with a white collar offense, it is important to begin building a strong defense in your case immediately. Contact economic crime defense lawyer Stephanie Selloni at 516-972-1212. The legal team at Law Office of Stephanie Selloni can help you fight the allegations against you and work to get a favorable outcome in your case. Call today to schedule a free initial consultation.